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Best Banana Split

Best Banana Split

banana Split Recipe

Best Banana Split

In 1904, the first banana split recipe was made in Latrobe, Pennsylvania by David Strickler, an apprentice pharmacist at a local drug store.  Here is his original recipe.

 

Super Easy To Make

1 Banana, peeled and split lengthwise

1 Scoop each vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry ice cream

2 Tablespoons sliced fresh strawberries or 1 tablespoon strawberry ice cream topping

2 Tablespoons pineapple chunks or 1 tablespoon pineapple ice cream topping

2 Tablespoons whipped cream

1 Tablespoon chopped peanuts

1 Tablespoon chocolate syrup

2 Maraschino cherries with stems

Place peeled/split banana in a dessert dish, place scoops of ice cream between bananas.  Top with remaining ingredients. 

Banana, peeled and split lengthwise.  Scoop each vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry ice cream.  Although, Tablespoons sliced fresh strawberries or 1 tablespoon strawberry ice cream topping. in conclusion, Tablespoons pineapple chunks or 1 tablespoon pineapple ice cream topping, 2 Tablespoons whipped cream. 1 chopped peanut or 1 Tablespoon chocolate syrup 2 Maraschino cherries with stems. Place peeled/split banana in a dessert dish, place scoops of ice cream between bananas.  Top with remaining ingredients. Banana, peeled and split lengthwise, 1 Scoop each vanilla, chocolate, and strawberry ice cream, 2 Tablespoons sliced fresh strawberries, or 1 tablespoon strawberry ice cream topping. The Best Banana Split recipe

Pecan Pie Day August 20th

Pecan Pie Day August 20th

Pecan Pie, Clarkston Cleaning Services

Pecan Pie Day August 20th

Sugar pies were extremely popular in medieval Europe, and as Europeans started to immigrate to America, many sugar pie recipes were reimagined using local ingredients.  Pecan Pie is believed to be a variant of chess pie which also has a butter and sugar custard center.  While pecan pies were likely being eaten before the 1800s, the first official published recipe was in an issue of “Harper’s Bazaar” magazine in 1886.

 

Pecan Pie without Corn Syrup

“Filling only”

 

2 cups pecans

¾ cup packed light brown sugar

¾ cup maple syrup

6 tablespoons unsalted butter

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 large eggs

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees

 

Spread the pecans on a baking sheet and bake on the center rack until toasted, 10 to 12 minutes.  Cool completely.  Reserve 15 pecans, then roughly chop the rest of the pecans.

Bake the pie shell as directed (I use premade pie shell for a 9-inch pie)

While the crust is baking, combine the brown sugar, maple syrup, butter, and salt in a medium saucepan.  Bring to a boil over medium heat and, stirring constantly, continue to boil for 1 full minute.  Remove from the heat and stir in chopped pecans and vanilla.  Set aside to cool slightly, about 5 minutes.  Whisk the eggs into the filling until smooth, then pour the filling into a warm crust.  Top with the reserved pecans.

Bake on the lower rack until the filling is set around the edges but still slightly loose in the center, 40 to 45 minutes.  (If the edges of the crust begin to get too dark, cover the edge loosely with foil).  Cool on a wire rack completely before serving.

 

 

 

 

Baking With The Kids

Baking With The Kids

health and well being

Baking with the Kids

 

 

November!  The official ping on the grown-up calendar that the holidays, baking with the kids, and all things ‘family’ has begun.

If you bake for gifts, you know how daunting this can be.  There are people you work with, maybe employees and their families, friends, out-of-state/area family…the list can be long! One thing is for sure: cookies and homemade goodies are always a favorite!

Since cranking out a lot of tasty treats takes a fair while, get the kids involved!  It’s a great opportunity to score some fun family time and also teach them a few skills like measuring, and mixing, frosting, and decorating.  Baking with the kids should take too much arm-twisting with all the sweetness and bowl-licking ahead!

 

Where to Begin?

First, gather the family around to make a list of everyone who will receive baked goods.  Are you mailing them?  Do you need gift bags or other kinds of packaging?  Do the kids have friends they want to include?  Their teachers? The neighbors?  Are you going to make special cookies for some people?  Here’s a checklist of to-do’s so all goes as smoothly (and as fun) as possible on baking day:

  • It’s probably a good idea to make some freezer space to store some ingredients and finished products until they’re ready to be given out.
  • Do you need to clean the oven? Do this before it gets too cold outside to open windows for this process.
  • Mark the calendar for the day(s) you plan to bake, so all hands are on deck!
  • Clear space in the kitchen for mixing and decorating stations, and for cookies to cool.
  • Have a set of bulk recipes that can be done fast and furious for those “surprise!” people or if you’re not into baking that much.
  • Check that you have the right equipment or that what you have is in good condition.
  • Take the kids shopping for the ingredients. They love picking out big bags of chocolate chips or sugar. It can be a learning opportunity to understand how much things are, what ingredients go into making cookies, and why this is a cost-efficient way to give at the holidays.

Baking with the Kids

On the appointed day double check to make sure everything is ready:

  • Is everyone rested up? This may sound odd, but things can devolve quickly if there has been some stress or illness. Is it a good day?  Or do we need to postpone?
  • Are bellies full of good food first? Everyone is less likely to nibble away at the sweetness or have “hangry” outbursts.
  • Put on your favorite music! Do you like holiday music?  Show tunes? Rock and roll?  Turn it up and create a fun atmosphere.
  • Decide which child is in charge of what portion of the project. Do you plan to rotate to keep it interesting…and maybe keep kids from arguing? Of course, keep things age-appropriate, but also a little challenging so learning can happen.
  • Assembly lines help to make sure all the steps are followed properly, and you get good results.

 

Plan for mishaps like burned fingers or cookies, forgotten ingredients, and spills. Snap a few pics for holiday card making! It might be a good idea to have some back up cleaning help for the next day, but make it fun no matter what and you will make precious memories.

 

Photo credit: https://unsplash.com/@americanheritagechocolate

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